What is an art of ignorance

Friedrich Nietzsche
(1844-1900)

Painter, sculptor, architect, poet (Italy)Friedrich Nietzsche at wikipedia >>> Print the page
 

"Art is worth more than the truth."

 

"Art is based on man's natural ignorance of his inner being (in body and character): it is not there for physicists and philosophers."

 

"Art is not there at all for these active people, but for those who have an excess of leisure and can therefore, as an exception, give their highest seriousness to the artist: for the existence of this class of idle Olympians, those active people (be they workers or bankers or officials) with their overwork. If the existence of this class is an evil, then art is an evil too. Art is the activity of the idle. "

 

"Art is the free, surplus strength of a people that is not wasted in the struggle for existence."

 

"We have the art so that we do not perish from the truth."

 

"Absolute knowledge leads to pessimism: art is the remedy against it."

 

"The artist perceives what non-artists call" form "as content."

 

"The championship is achieved if you neither take offense nor hesitate in the execution."

 

"It is not uncommon to come across copies of important people; and most of them, as with paintings, like the copies better than the originals."

 

"For us, art is the elimination of unnaturalism, an escape from culture and education."

 

"The sober, the tired, the exhausted, the withered (e.g. a scholar) can receive absolutely nothing from art because they do not have the original artistic power, the necessity of wealth: those who cannot give receive nothing."

 

"It is a disadvantage for good thoughts if they follow one another too quickly; they obscure each other's view. That is why the greatest artists and writers have made extensive use of the mediocre."

 

"Art is the form in which the world appears under the delusion of its necessity. It is a seductive representation of the will that interferes with knowledge."

 

"Art comes from ability. If it came from want, it would be called desire."