What is lead attribution

PsyDok

Summary:Two psychological models for explaining devaluation and increased attribution of responsibility to victims of strokes of fate are discussed: the defensive attribution hypothesis and the just world theory. In doing so, the implicit assumptions of both approaches are worked out, according to which the need for justice or control should lead to increased attribution of responsibility to the victims, which should lead to feelings of invulnerability and security again. In addition, other attitude variables are discussed that could increase or decrease the level of responsibility attributed to the victims, e.g. B. Assumptions about the freedom or determination of human action, mild judgment and draconianism, attitudes towards guilt or strategic considerations. Results from a questionnaire survey on cancer diseases are then reported (N = 326). Among other things, the bivariate and multivariate correlations of different generalized attitudes and beliefs with attributions of responsibility for cancer diseases to the victims, to their fellow human beings, society, industry, the sciences, the churches, the media, a predetermined fate, God's will, natural processes and communicated by chance. A review of a path model modeled according to the implicit assumptions of the two theoretical conceptions shows that the belief in immanent justice leads to increased attribution of responsibility to the victims, but by no means also to feelings of security and invulnerability. The belief in internal control, on the other hand, goes hand in hand with a heightened sense of security, but without taking the detour via ascribing responsibility.
Two psychological conceptions are discussed as explanations for derogation and increased attributions of responsibility to victims of misfortune: the defensive attribution hypothesis and just world theory. The implicit assumptions of both conceptions are elaborated according to which the need for control respectively the need for justice should lead to increased attributions of responsibility and these attributions should lead to feelings of security and invulnerability. Additionally, other attitudinal variables are discussed which might increase or reduce the amount of responsibility attributed to victims, such as basic assumptions concerning freedom and determinism, lenience and draconity of judgment, attitudes towards guilt or strategic considerations. Then, results from a self report study on cancer (N = 326) are presented. Among others, the bivariate and multivariate correlations of different generalized attitudes and belief systems with responsibility attributions to victims, to their fellows, to society, to industry, to science, to the media, to destiny, to God’s will, to natural processes and to chance are reported. Finally, a path model is tested that was derived from the implicit assumptions of the two psychological conceptions. It is shown that belief in immanent justice goes along with increased responsitility attributed to victims but not with increased feelings of security and invulnerability. Belief in internal control goes along with increased feelings of security but without going through responsibility attributions.