Should the national airspace be vertically limited

COMMISSION IMPLEMENTING REGULATION (EU) No. 716/2014

dated June 27, 2014

on the establishment of the joint pilot project to support the implementation of the European air traffic management master plan

based on Regulation (EC) No. 550/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 10 March 2004 on the provision of air navigation services in the single European sky (1), in particular on Article 15a (3),

(1) This Regulation establishes the first joint project, hereinafter referred to as the "joint pilot project". As part of the joint pilot project, a first group of ATM functions is defined which are to be introduced in a timely, coordinated and synchronized manner so that the European ATM functions Major operational changes outlined in the master plan can be achieved.

(2) This Regulation applies to the European Air Traffic Management Network (EATMN) and the systems for air navigation services according to Annex I of Regulation (EC) No. 552/2004. It applies to the parties listed in the Annex to this Ordinance.

For the purposes of this regulation, the definitions in Article 2 of Regulation (EC) No. 549/2004 and in Article 2 of Implementing Regulation (EU) No. 409/2013 apply.

These ATM functions are explained in the appendix.

(2) The parties involved in the operation and the network manager listed in the annex shall introduce the ATM functions in accordance with paragraph 1 and implement the associated operating procedures so that their seamless operation in accordance with the annex and Implementing Regulation (EU) No. 409/2013 is guaranteed. The military parties involved in the operation only introduce these ATM functions to the extent necessary to comply with Annex II Part A number 4 of Regulation (EC) No. 552/2004.

The Commission publishes on its website the following reference and supporting material for the introduction of the ATM functions under Article 3 (1):

Monitoring by the Commission in accordance with Article 6 of Implementing Regulation (EU) No. 409/2013 is carried out in particular using the following planning and reporting instruments:

The Commission shall review this Regulation, taking into account the information and advice provided by the deployment management pursuant to Article 9 (2) (e) and following the coordination and consultation pursuant to Article 9 of Implementing Regulation 409/2013, the information obtained as part of the monitoring pursuant to Article 5 and the technical developments in Air traffic management and submit the result of the review to the Single Sky Committee.

The Commission will initiate the first review no later than 18 months after the deployment program has been approved.

This Regulation shall enter into force on the twentieth day following its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union.

(2) Implementing Regulation (EU) No. 409/2013 of the Commission of 3 May 2013 on the definition of joint projects, the establishment of decision-making structures and the creation of incentives for supporting the implementation of the European master plan for air traffic management (OJ L 123 of 4.5.2013, p. 1).

(3) Regulation (EC) No. 552/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 10 March 2004 on the interoperability of the European air traffic management network (OJ L 96, 31.3.2004, p. 26).

(5) Regulation (EC) No. 549/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 10 March 2004 laying down the framework for the creation of the single European sky (OJ L 96, 31.3.2004, p. 1).

(6) Implementing Regulation (EU) No. 390/2013 of the Commission of 3 May 2013 laying down a performance system for air navigation services and network functions (OJ L 128 of 9.5.2013, p. 1).

(7) Implementing Regulation (EU) No. 91/2013 of the Commission of 3 May 2013 laying down a common fee system for air navigation services (OJ L 128, 9.5.2013, p. 31).

ATTACHMENT

1. ADVANCED APPROACH MANAGEMENT AND PERFORMANCE-BASED NAVIGATION IN LOCAL TRAFFIC AREA WITH HIGH TRAFFIC DENSITY

Extended arrival management (AMAN) and performance-based navigation (PBN) in terminal maneuvering areas (TMA) with high traffic density improve the precision of the approach path and facilitate the sequencing of air traffic at an earlier stage . The extended approach management supports the expansion of the planning horizon to at least 180-200 nautical miles up to and including the top point of the descent for incoming flights. The performance-based navigation in the local traffic sector with high traffic density refers to the development and implementation of fuel-saving and / or environmentally friendly take-off and landing procedures (required navigation performance 1 standard instrument departures (RNP 1 SID), standard approach routes (STAR)) and landing approach (Required Navigation Performance Approach, RNP APCH).

This function is made up of two sub-functions:

Approach management extended to the entire cross-country airspace

improved airspace in the local traffic area through RNP-supported operation.

1.1. Operational and technical scope

1.1.1. Approach management extended to the entire cross-country airspace

The approach management, which has been extended to the entire route airspace, extends the AMAN horizon from 100-120 nautical miles to 180-200 nautical miles from the arrival airport. The traffic can be sequenced during the cross-country flight phase and in the early descent phases.

The Air Traffic Control (ATC) services in the TMA, which carry out the AMAN, coordinate with the Air Traffic Services (ATS) offices responsible for the adjacent route airspace sectors.

The existing procedures for the management of AMAN bottlenecks, especially with regard to time to lose or gain and notes on speed, can be used to apply this function.

System requirements

The AMAN systems are required to provide arrival sequence timing for en-route ATC systems up to 180-200 nautical miles from the arrival airport.

The ATC systems of the upstream air traffic control units (ATS) have to manage AMAN bottlenecks. The management of the bottlenecks during the approach is to be supported by data exchange, data processing and display of the information at the workplace of the respective air traffic controller in the air traffic control units (ATS units); the data exchange between ATS offices can be achieved with the help of the existing technology until the system-wide information management (SWIM) has been implemented.

1.1.2. Improved airspace in the local traffic area through RNP-supported operation

An improved airspace in the local traffic area through RNP-supported operation consists in the implementation of environmentally friendly procedures for approach / departure and landing by PBN in the local traffic area with high traffic density according to the following navigation specifications:

SID and STAR use the RNP 1 specification using the Radius to Fix (RF) path terminator;

the necessary navigation performance for the approach with approach procedures with vertical guidance (RNP APCH with APV).

The improved airspace in the local transport sector through RNP-based operations includes the following:

RNP 1 SID, STAR and Transitions (using the "Radius to Fix (RF)" annex);

RNP APCH (Lateral Navigation / Vertical Navigation, LNAV / VNAV) and minimum values ​​for the approach procedure with vertical guidance (Localiser Performance with Vertical guidance, LPV).

System requirements

ATC systems and ATC safety nets must enable PBN operation in local traffic and on approach.

RNP 1 operation requires that the system's total lateral and longitudinal total system error (TSE) is ± 1 nautical miles for at least 95% of the flight time; in addition, on-board performance monitoring, alarming and navigation databases of high integrity are required.

For RNP APCH, the total transverse and longitudinal system error (TSE) for the final approach segment must be ± 0.3 nautical miles for at least 95% of the flight time; in addition, on-board performance monitoring, alerting and navigation databases of high integrity are required;

both RNP 1 and RNP APCH require input from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS);

vertical navigation in support of the APV can be done by the satellite-based system to improve the radio navigation signals of the GNSS (SBAS) or by barometric altitude sensors.

1.2. Geographical scope

1.2.1. EU and EFTA member states

The expanded AMAN and PBN in the local traffic area with high traffic density and the associated cross-country airspace sectors are to be operated at the following airports:

Frankfurt International

Munich Franz Josef Strauss

Düsseldorf International

Berlin Brandenburg Airport

Palma de Mallorca Son San Juan

1.2.2. Other third countries

The expanded AMAN and the PBN in TMA with high traffic density were to be operated at Istanbul Ataturk Airport.

1.3. Participants and introduction date required for the implementation of the function

ATS service providers and the network manager must ensure that ATS units that provide air traffic control services in the airspace in the local traffic area of ​​the airports mentioned under number 1.2 and the associated en route airspace sectors, the extended AMAN and the PBN in TMA with high traffic density from January 1, 2024 apply.

1.4. Need for timing

The introduction of the extended AMAN and the PBN in TMA with high traffic density must be coordinated on the network performance due to the potential impact of the delays in implementation at the airports mentioned under number 1.2. From a technical point of view, the introduction of targeted system and process changes must be timed to ensure that the performance goals are achieved. Several airport operators and air traffic control organizations will be involved in the timing of the investments. In addition, the timing of the industrialization phase must be coordinated, especially in the supply industry.

1.5. Essential prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for this function. An existing AMAN facilitates the operational integration of this ATM function into existing systems.

1.6. Interactions with other ATM functions

The exchange of data between ATS offices, especially with regard to the extended AMAN, must be carried out with the help of system-wide information management (SWIM), provided the iSWIM function mentioned under number 5 is available.

The AMAN must, if available, use the information on the flight path transmitted on the downlink in accordance with number 6.

2. AIRPORT INTEGRATION AND THROUGHPUT

Airport integration and throughput facilitate the provision of approach and airport control services by improving runway safety and throughput, increasing integration and taxiing safety, and reducing dangerous situations on runways.

This function is made up of five sub-functions:

Departure management coordinated with the determination of the sequence of the handling procedures prior to departure

Departure management taking into account the constraints in ground traffic management

time-based separation for the final approach

automatic support of the air traffic controller in the planning of ground traffic and taxi guidance.

Airport safety nets.

2.1. Operational and technical scope

2.1.1. Departure management coordinated with the determination of the sequence of the handling procedures prior to departure

The departure management, which is coordinated with the determination of the sequence of the handling procedures prior to departure, is a means of controlling the departure traffic flows at one or more airports by calculating the target time for take-off (Target Take Off Time, TTOT) and the target time for take-off clearance (Target Start Approval Time, TSAT) for each flight, taking into account various constraints and preferences. In pre-departure management, the departure traffic flows to a runway are controlled by managing the end of the check-in process (via the take-off times), taking into account the available runway capacity. In combination with "Airports - Collaborative Decision-Making (A-CDM)", the management reduces taxi times before departure and increases compliance with the air traffic flow control slot (ATFM slot) and the predictability of departure times. Departure management is geared towards managing the largest possible traffic flows on the runway by defining a sequence with an optimized minimum staggering.

Those involved in the operation of the A-CDM jointly determine the sequence of handling before departure, taking into account the agreed principles that are to be applied for specific reasons (e.g. waiting times at the runway, observance of the slot, departure routes, Preferences of the airspace users, nocturnal take-offs, clearing of the stands / gates for arriving aircraft, unfavorable conditions including de-icing, actual taxi / runway capacity, current bottlenecks, etc.).

System requirements

Departure management (DMAN) and A-CDM systems must be integrated and support an optimized sequence of handling before departure with information management systems for airspace users (input of the reliable prediction of the end of handling (Target Off Block Time, TOBT)) and the airport (input of context-related data) .

DMAN systems must work out a cooperative sequence for both the TTOT and the TSAT. TTOT and TSAT have to take into account variable taxi times and are to be updated according to the actual take-off of the aircraft; DMAN systems must provide the air traffic controller with the list of TSAT and TTOT for the flow control of the aircraft.

2.1.2. Departure management including the bottlenecks in ground traffic management

Departure management, including bottlenecks in ground traffic management, is an ATM instrument for determining optimal ground traffic plans (e.g. taxiway plans); this includes the calculation and the sequence of movements and the optimized use of resources (e.g. of de-icing systems). The departure sequence at the runway must be optimized according to the actual traffic situation, taking into account any changes outside the gate or during taxiing to the runway.

Advanced Surface Movement Guidance and Control Systems (A-SMGCS) offer optimized taxi times and improve the predictability of take-off times by monitoring actual ground traffic and by observing updated taxi times in departure management.

System requirements

DMAN systems have to include variable and updated taxi times in the calculation of TSAT and TTOT. Interfaces between the DMAN and the A-SMGCS routing are to be developed.

DMANs that incorporate A-SMGCS bottlenecks using a digital system, such as Electronic Flight Strips (EFS) with an advanced A-SMGCS routing function, are to be integrated into the flight data processing systems for the order of departure and route calculation .

An A-SMGCS routing function is to be introduced.

2.1.3. Time-based separation for the final approach

With time-based separation (TBS), the order of the aircraft when approaching a runway is staggered based on the time interval instead of the distance. It can be used during the final approach by showing the air traffic controller appropriate distance information, taking into account the prevailing wind conditions. Minimum values ​​for the radar-based separation and parameters for the wake vortex separation are to be integrated into a supporting TBS instrument, which offers the air traffic controller orientation aid in order to allow a time interval between the aircraft on the final approach, in which the effects of the headwind are taken into account.

System requirements

The flight data processing systems and the advanced approach management (AMAN) must be compatible with the supporting TBS instrument and capable of switching between the regulations for time and distance-based radar-based wake vortex separation.

The air traffic controller's workplace must include the supporting TBS instrument with safety nets to assist the air traffic controller in calculating the TBS distance while observing the minimum values ​​for radar-based separation using the actual wind conditions on the glide slope.

Local meteorological (MET) information on actual wind conditions on the glide slope should be provided by the supporting TBS instrument.

The supporting TBS instrument shall ensure automatic monitoring and warning of non-compliant airspeed on final approach, automatic monitoring and warning of under-graduation and automatic monitoring and warning of the wrong aircraft being assigned to a graduation indicator.

The supporting TBS instrument and the air traffic controller's workstation connected to it have to calculate the indicator distance and display it on the air traffic controller's monitor.

The TBS must be supported by safety nets that record the automatic monitoring and warning in the event of under-graduation.

2.1.4. Automatic support for the air traffic controller in the planning of ground traffic and taxiing

The taxi guidance and planning functions of the A-SMGCS automatically determine taxi routes and the corresponding taxi time, taking potential conflicts into account.

Taxi routes can be changed manually by air traffic controllers before assigning them to aircraft and ground vehicles. These routes are available in the flight data processing system.

System requirements

The A-SMGCS routing and planning function has to calculate most of the routes relevant for the operation as conflict-free as possible, so that movements of the aircraft from the stand to the runway, from the runway to the stand or other ground traffic are possible.

The air traffic controller's workplace must enable the air traffic controller to control the taxiing guide on the ground.

The flight data processing system must be able to record the planned and released routes that have been assigned to aircraft and ground vehicles and manage the status of the taxiing route for all affected aircraft and ground vehicles.

2.1.5. Airport safety nets

Airport safety nets consist of the detection of and warning of competing air traffic control clearances (ATC clearances) for aircraft as well as deviations of ground and aircraft from their instructions, procedures or taxi guides, which could potentially lead to a risk of collision between ground and aircraft. The scope of this sub-function includes the area of ​​ground movements on the runway and the airfield.

Supporting ATC instruments at the airfield determine competing air traffic control clearances; the ATC system operates on the basis of the known data, including the aircraft and ground vehicles issued by the air traffic controller, the assigned runway and the stopping point. The air traffic controllers enter all clearances issued to the aircraft or ground vehicles into the ATC system using a digital system, for example the EFS.

Different types of competing clearances can be identified (e.g. taxiing onto the runway versus takeoff). Some may only be based on input from the air traffic controller; others may use additional data such as A-SMGCS monitoring data.

The airport security netting instruments warn air traffic controllers when aircraft and ground vehicles deviate from ATC instructions, procedures, or taxiing. The instructions for air traffic controllers available electronically (through a digital system, e.g. EFS) are linked to other data, e.g. B. Flight plan, monitoring, routing, published rules and procedures. Linking this data will enable the system to monitor the information and, if discrepancies are found, to warn the air traffic controller (e.g. no pushback clearance).

System requirements

Airport safety nets must integrate A-SMGCS surveillance data and runway clearances from the air traffic controller; When monitoring airport conformity, the A-SMGCS ground traffic management, the monitoring data and the route clearances by the air traffic controllers must be integrated.

A-SMGCS has to include the advanced routing and planning function according to number 2.1.4, so that alarm messages with regard to the monitoring of conformity are possible.

A-SMGCS has to include a function for generating and disseminating appropriate warning messages. These warning messages are to be implemented as an additional level above the existing A-SMGCS level 2 alarm messages, not as a substitute for them.

At the air traffic controller's workplace, warning and alarm messages, including support for canceling an alarm message, are to be managed via a suitable human-machine interface.

Digital systems, e.g. EFS, have the instructions of the air traffic controllers with other data, e.g. E.g. flight plan, monitoring, routing, published regulations and procedures.

2.2. Geographical scope

2.2.1. EU and EFTA member states

The departure management coordinated with the determination of the sequence of the handling procedures prior to departure, departure management including the constraints in ground traffic management, automatic support of the air traffic controller in the planning of ground traffic and taxiing and airport safety nets are to be used at the following airports:

Frankfurt International

Munich Franz Josef Strauss

Düsseldorf International

Berlin Brandenburg Airport

Palma de Mallorca Son San Juan

The time-based graduation for the final approach is to be used at the following airports:

Frankfurt International

Munich Franz Josef Strauss

Düsseldorf International