Why do hackers use Linux over BSD

Unix versus Linux: A Comparison of the Two Operating Systems

Advantages of Unix

Advantages of Linux

Stable and mature environment, especially for servers and workstations

Versatile OS, particularly suitable for the server market (special Linux server distributions are available), many clouds use Linux

Runs on many hardware platforms (portability), tailor-made solutions with optimal adaptation to the hardware

Broad hardware support, regardless of the manufacturer (applies to CPUs, servers, workstations, PCs, mini computers)

Chargeable UNIX systems are consistently further developed, customer needs are taken into account

Most distributions are free of charge (CD / DVD, Internet download)

Secure (e.g. restriction of user rights, encryption)

Secure (e.g. restriction of user rights, encryption)

Mature scripting (shell)

Mature scripting (shell)

Very suitable for programmers and system administrators

Very suitable for programmers and system administrators, several intuitive GUIs especially for desktop users

Large selection of programs and tools (many of them already included in the OS)

Large selection of programs and tools (many of them already included in the OS)

Particularly suitable for business-critical areas

Frequent updates and security loopholes are closed quite quickly

Thanks to the POSIX standard, Unix applications also run on Linux (migration possible)

Thanks to the POSIX standard, Linux applications also run on Unix (migration possible)

 

Low hardware requirements, good system performance

 

Portable versions available without installation (e.g. on DVD, USB stick)

Disadvantages of Unix

Disadvantages of Linux

Limited target group as the focus is on experienced users and IT professionals

A certain amount of training time is required for Linux beginners, while those who switch may have to do without familiar software

Many (special) solutions on the server market are chargeable and tied to specific hardware from a manufacturer

In the server market, possibly higher support costs for commercial Linux distributions

Tendentially higher hardware requirements (especially for commercial and license-based systems)

Linux has security gaps, malware (servers are particularly at risk)

Rather infrequent updates and slow development

Drivers for new hardware (PCs, graphics cards) sometimes appear with a delay

Declining user numbers, being partly displaced by Linux (especially in the server market)

Tendency towards fragmentation in Linux development (large number of Linux distributions)

Almost insignificant in the desktop market

Small market shares for desktop PCs and notebooks