In which direction do our galaxies rotate?

In which direction is the Milky Way rotating?

The Milky Way has arms that form due to density waves. Like most spiral galaxies, the arms retract. Individual stars orbit (approximately) in a circle, neither in the direction of the center nor away from it.

If you look at a common map of the Milky Way Galaxy (viewed from a point north of Earth, Heavenly North is not the same as Ecliptic North, both of which are about 60 degrees from Galactic North). The stars in the galaxy would move clockwise.

If you were to see from the other side it would be like you made a mirror image of the galaxy so the movement would be counterclockwise. If you look at the back of a watch, the hand is moving counterclockwise from the wrong side. However, the rotation of the galaxy is still with trailing arms.

There are a few galaxies spinning with arms guiding: NGC 4622 is an example.

dean

Good answer, but I think if you are using north as a reference point it should be pointed out that Heavenly North is not the same as Ecliptic North, both of which are about 60 degrees from Galactic North. Maybe a chart like this would help physicsforums.com/attachments/...

Mishu 米 殊

Thank you very much! This answers all of my puzzles. The clockwise / counterclockwise question is that as you read this article, the galaxy could be rotating in either direction. As an independent system, the galaxy constantly rotates in only one direction. only the observer got the opposite impression due to the reference point of the observation, right?