Where are George Washington's descendants

Black descendants of famous Americans

H. E. T. The talk about Thomas Jefferson's dark-skinned descendants won't stop. As early as 1802, James T. Callender claimed that Jefferson had an affair with his slave, Sally Hemings. The third President of the United States never commented on the allegation. But he found

H. E. T. The talk about Thomas Jefferson's dark-skinned descendants won't stop. As early as 1802, James T. Callender claimed that Jefferson had an affair with his slave, Sally Hemings. The third President of the United States never commented on the allegation. But until recently he found many defense attorneys who assured them that he had never been guilty of miscegenation. One of the defense lawyers was Dumas Malone, who wrote a multi-volume work on Jefferson.

Malone and other "experts" also maintained their justification after Fawn M. Brodie [1] in 1974 presented extensive evidence of a relationship between Jefferson and Sally Hemings. Jefferson's defense lawyers took for granted that this vital man had been sexually abstinent for 43 years following the death of his wife, who had six births in the ten years of their marriage.

DNA - no definitive proof?

A DNA test appears to prove that Jefferson had children with Sally Heming's. But the test is being contested because the comparative material did not come from Jefferson himself, but from a relative. The Jefferson Descendants Association welcomed the black descendants of Sally Hemings for a brief period at their meetings. However, they ruled her out again in 2002.

But not only Jefferson had black offspring, Washington is also linked to well-known African-American families in the state capital. One of the high quality restaurants in Soussol's National Press Building was run by a family named Costin until it was remodeled. This traces her ancestry back to a black half-sister of Martha Washington, the wife of George Washington. He never had children. Two people who are probably descended from his father-in-law can still be found in the Washington D.C. telephone directory, others in the suburbs.

Another family, Syphax, traces its ancestry back to Bushrod Washington, a nephew of the first president. Bushrod was his mother's family name. Syphax, on the other hand, was the name of a Numidian chief who was involved in Rome's wars against Carthage in 203 BC. Was captured and died in Italy. Bushrod Washington served on the United States Supreme Court. He sold slaves he had inherited from Martha Washington, although the late George Washington had ordered their release. [2] The numerous citizens who today bear the name Washington are - as far as we know - not connected to the family of the founding father.

Nine presidents as slave owners

Nine of the first sixteen presidents of the United States until the abolition of this "special institution" kept slaves, most likely Jefferson with over 150, closely followed by George Washington to Martin Van Buren's house servant. Dr. In England, according to Boswell, Samuel Johnson (1709-84) exclaimed indignantly: "How is it that we hear the loudest yapping for freedom from negro flayers?" Samuel Johnson was not uncritical of the independence movement in the thirteen North American colonies.

[1] Fawn M. Brodie: Thomas Jefferson. An intimate history. A Bantam Book, New York 1974.

[2] Stewart Alsop: The Center. The Anatomy of Power in Washington, p. 26. Hodder and Stoughton, London. 1968.