What are the most famous trumpet musicians

Gábor Boldoczki: "The trumpet can take on many roles."

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(c) Marco Borggreve

Heard blindly

Gábor Boldoczki is the man in the triumvirate of young trumpet record stars alongside Alison Balsom and Tine Thing Helseth. The 38-year-old Hungarian, who teaches as a professor at the Franz Liszt University in Budapest, leads an astonishing double life: As an exclusive artist for Sony Classical, he only records music from the 18th century, while playing a wide range of live music plays numerous world premieres. At the “Blind Heard” between two breaks in Potsdam's Nikolaisaal, he apologizes in advance: “I don't hear much trumpet music. If you play, rehearse and practice a lot, then you don't listen to trumpet music on CD. "

Ha, I recognize the piece! But I've never heard the recording, I'm quite sure of that. And I'm sure it's not Maurice André and it's not Reinhold Friedrich either. My guess is Wynton Marsalis. This is played according to the original text, and in terms of orchestral sound and tempo it looks like an older recording. And then there is an ornament here, a kind of trill that you can play in two ways, and I think like this it only plays Wynton Marsalis. He's an important trumpeter, he made nice recordings, but for me he still plays jazz better than classical. (laughs) The Haydn Concerto is one of our most important pieces. I don't play it that often and that's why I always look forward to it. Every orchestra has its own sound and character, and it's exciting to see how you fit in and what comes out of it in the rehearsals. Haydn was a sensational composer anyway, but this was his last instrumental concerto, it is a very mature work. Greatly composed for trumpet.

Trumpet Concerto in E flat major Hob.VIIe: 1st, 3rd movement

Wynton Marsalis, National Philharmonic Orchestra, Raymond Leppard

Sony

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Reinhold Friedrich? Håkan Hardenberger? Then it's Sergei Nakariakov! That must be an old recording where he is still playing a trumpet vibrato. I would recognize his vibrato today, it's fantastic, like a string. We are very good friends and play together again and again. This piece is composed for Bb trumpet, and Sergei mainly plays Bb trumpet and flugelhorn. And it is played very musically and sensitively, which suits Sergei. For me he is a really great musician. We both don't see ourselves primarily as trumpeters, but as musicians who want to express something, and the trumpet is just the means to do so. My father played the trumpet and taught brass instruments. I started when I was nine and stuck with it - and now I don't change anymore. (laughs) What do I like about the trumpet? It offers so many possibilities through the different instruments. I have eight different trumpets at home: four piccolos in three tunings, flugelhorn, C, Eb and B flat trumpet - and each instrument has a different character. Which instrument you choose is usually prescribed for newer music. Richard Strauss, who was a master of orchestration, wrote two long pages in his book about which trumpet should be used where. And his last sentence is: Ultimately, the trumpeter has to decide. (laughs) That's why you can edit baroque music so well. You can play a melancholy oboe concerto on the trumpet as well as a virtuoso violin concerto. You can play very loud and with a damper you can also play extremely quietly. The flugelhorn has a melancholy, soft sound, the piccolo sounds very festive - the trumpet can simply take on many roles. Of course we play a lot of baroque and classical music, and the combination of trumpet and chamber orchestra is very popular. But I often only play with the piano, there is a lot of romantic and contemporary literature, and the pianists are happy that they finally don't have to withdraw. I find the combination of trumpet and percussion, which I will do with Martin Grubinger, very interesting.

Trumpet Concerto op.94

Sergei Nakariakov, Jena Philharmonic, Andrei Boreyko

Teldec Classics

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Is that Handel? Vivaldi? I would play this piece on a piccolo trumpet, and that it is played on a larger instrument suggests an orchestral trumpeter. One from Germany, the tones are very round, there is a certain darkness in the high register. I played very little in the orchestra. It's different. As a soloist you have to play a lot. In the orchestra you often play very intensely, but then you have long pauses again. That requires a different strength and attitude. This is a nice shot! Gábor Tarkövi of the Berlin Philharmonic? I thought I knew all of his recordings. Playing with the organ is fun. I play a lot with Iveta Apkalna and Hedwig Bilgram, who played with Maurice André for 35 years. When is Maurice André, the greatest trumpeter, coming? I would recognize it by the first note! He really was a legend. If you consider: In the Baroque period the trumpet was very popular and held a high rank, then in the Classical period it became a tutti instrument, and in the Romantic period it got more and more orchestral solos. And then Maurice André came along and showed that the trumpet can really stand alone on the stage. His recordings are still valid, even if the baroque is played differently today. But he always played faithfully and convincingly, he had charisma and was a nice person. I wouldn't call him my role model, but as a pupil I only heard Maurice André, there was nothing else. Then came Reinhold Friedrich, who was also my teacher in Karlsruhe for two years. He is also a very important trumpeter and for me one of the greatest, also as a musician.

Concerto in F major RV 455, arr. For trumpet and organ

Gabor Tarkövi, Peter Kofler

Tudor / Naxos

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I don't know that either. Nice! I have a baroque trumpet at home, but I don't play a lot. The way I teach the trumpet is simple: you have to breathe in and breathe out together with the instrument and if you think that way, it is theoretically the same whether I play the modern or natural trumpet. We take in air and when we exhale we need to be able to create the tone with our tongue, articulation and air speed. On the natural trumpet, the intonation has to be perfect because there are no valves. Otherwise there will be a quack immediately. On the modern trumpet the tone only gets bad when I don't hit it properly, then the kiekser comes. Of course it's a different feeling of air because a natural trumpet is twice as long. But it is good practice for any trumpeter. I find natural trumpets especially beautiful for Bach cantatas or symphonies by Haydn and Mozart. I recorded my last album with the Cappella Gabetta, which plays on historical instruments. The musicians tuned to 440 Hertz - and it worked wonderfully! I think this shot is beautiful here. But for a recording we have three microphones for the trumpet sound: one very close, one a meter away and one for the room. If I want to have this sound quality in a concert, the room has to be perfect, otherwise it won't work.

Sinfonia to the serenade "Il Barcheggio"

Friedemann Immer (baroque trumpet), Concerto Cologne

MDG / Naxos

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(after the first tone) Ligeti! There aren't many recordings of that. Played very well, that's very difficult! I recognize him by his voice when he calls in: This is Håkan Hardenberger. Playing contemporary music is fun. And it is our responsibility as musicians to find and animate composers. I don't want to judge whether this or that music is good. But if we still want an audience, I think it's good if we have melodies and harmonies and if you can feel that the piece begins here and it ends there, and in between there is a dramatic arc with emotions. When the trumpet is festive and loud and high, it is always impressive. But it is even more interesting when composers find other colors, dark and melancholy, or alternate between high and low. Fazıl Say composed a nice trumpet concerto for me, now Penderecki is writing a concerto for me, and I'm excited to see what's to come.

Mysteries Of The Macabre

Hakan Hardenberger, Roland Pöntinen

DG / Universal

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Festive trumpet concerts

Gábor Boldoczki, Sinfonia Varsovia, Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra

Sony

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Arnt Cobbers, RONDO issue 5/2014



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