How was your experience with Rapido

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  • Does anyone have experience with the RAPIDO honey mixer? I have a couple of questions about that.

  • Is that that double whisk?

    Sincerely, Hardy

    Turn to the sun and the shadows will stay behind you.

  • No Hardy,

    don't eat it.
    But scroll down the page a bit.
    At least for me there appear a lot of old postings on the topic.

    Waving friendly ...

    Michael

  • Oops ...> I hadn't even noticed "Similar topics" ...

    Sincerely, Hardy

    Turn to the sun and the shadows will stay behind you.

  • Who has actually had experience with the Rapido? I have questions about this. Please report, also by email.
    Best regards

  • Hello everybody
    I have one and I won't give it away

    You need a powerful drill, at least 2000 watts. Simply mill in and continue in the mass, otherwise too much air will be incorporated. Everything gets creamy.
    Could be cheaper as it is just an aluminum pump impeller with a long thin stainless steel shaft.

    Life should not be a journey with the aim of arriving at our grave attractive and with a well-preserved body.
    We should rather slide in sideways, chocolate in one hand, ice cream in the other, our bodies totally exhausted and screaming
    "Wow, what a ride!" ....

  • ... Everything becomes creamy.

    Hello Guido, does the honey stay creamy in the glass for a long time?

    Sincerely, Hardy

    Turn to the sun and the shadows will stay behind you.

  • Hello Hardy

    Yes! clearly
    with greetings to your wife, and at the same time happy Easter

    Life should not be a journey with the goal of arriving at our grave attractive and with a well-preserved body.
    We should rather slide in sideways, chocolate in one hand, ice cream in the other, our bodies totally exhausted and screaming
    "Wow, what a ride!" ....

  • Yes! clearly
    with greetings to your wife, and at the same time happy Easter

    Hello Guido, that is good news!

    And thank you - greetings back.

    Sincerely, Hardy

    Turn to the sun and the shadows will stay behind you.

  • Hello everybody
    I have one and I won't give it away

    You need a powerful drill, at least 2000 watts. Simply mill in and continue in the mass, otherwise too much air will be incorporated. Everything gets creamy.
    Could be cheaper as it is just an aluminum pump impeller with a long thin stainless steel shaft.



    Thanks for your information. That means I can't get by with my 400 watt drill (Black & Decker)? Funny, because you could even drill through stone with it, I don't understand that now. Hard honey is softer than stone. And the next question: how long should you at least wait after spinning before you start using the Rapido? The Rapido description says: the honey must be roughly crystallized, only then should you start using the Rapido. What does that mean exactly "roughly crystallized?"
    I'm a total beginner and I've never worked on honey, but this year it's my first time.
    And the next question: After stirring, pour honey directly into the jars and then close the jars? That's all? And then does the honey stay stiff "forever"? Or should you let the stirred honey stand in the bucket for another day so that the air bubbles can escape? You see, a lot of questions and what I would like best would be an instruction manual with your experience. I'm looking forward to your answer and your support.
    Easter greetings

  • Hello fellow campaigners,
    why do you think I sold my "mixer"?
    My approach today:
    The honey is only roughly sifted during spinning. All because I always have the greatest work peaks and fine sifting often takes a long time.
    For filling it then goes through the Melitherm, where it becomes liquid and of course is sifted through the cheesecloth.
    Then let stand, skim and stir for 3-4 minutes with the Rapido at high speed.
    Then hobbok by hobbok comes to the bottler and is mechanically (or in the case of smaller quantities) also manually filled into the jars.
    After 8 days at the latest, the honey, with the exception of robinia, is finely stiff and looks appetizing.

    Waving friendly ...

    Michael

  • ... and stir for 3-4 minutes with the Rapido at high speed.
    Then hobbok after hobbok comes to the bottler and ... ... is filled into the glasses.
    After 8 days at the latest, the honey, with the exception of robinia, is finely stiff and looks appetizing.

    Hi Michael,

    here again the question: Is it in the long run finely stiff, so also in 2 years?
    I am in the process of shooing my concrete out of the jars - although it is fine-creamy when pouring it (with a double spiral stirrer).

    Sincerely, Hardy

    Turn to the sun and the shadows will stay behind you.

  • Hello Hardy,

    You're supposed to be selling the honey, not exhibiting it on permanent loan in the Ottweiler local history museum or building dry stone walls out of the jars.
    I was just in the basement:
    The "oldest" bottling I still have is from October 2009, and I would call it creamy.
    Perhaps a customer will read along and be able to speak about older honey.
    So far nobody has complained about "concrete".

    Waving friendly ...

    Michael

  • So far nobody has complained about "concrete".

    My problem was: A shop had put the honey "to the side" when it was rearranged, then probably forgot it and ordered a new one.
    After about 3 months the old one was bone-hard and complained by spoiled customers ...

    I've now scraped off the concrete with a knife on a trial basis (Rapido principle) and poured it into a 250g jar. Wonderfully creamy.
    Let's see how long it stays that way.

    By the way: Take a look at the last PM ...

    Sincerely, Hardy

    Turn to the sun and the shadows will stay behind you.