What is the nationality of John Kasich

The debate is not even two minutes old when it is already very entertaining in Cleveland: Moderator Bret Baier asks those candidates to raise their hands who NOT want to promise to support the Republican winner after the primaries and to forego an independent candidacy.

Real estate billionaire Donald Trump, currently the leader in surveys, is the only one to raise his hand with a shrug. "He buys and sells politicians of all kinds," an angry Rand Paul immediately excites, "if he doesn't run as a Republican, he might support the Clintons!"

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The line between entertainment and serious politics is always fine in pre-election television debates, but Donald Trump actually gives the Republican event a circus-like feel at times. He insulted women and called them fat, says presenter Megyn Kelly. "Just Rosie O'Donnell," replies Trump, referring to the notoriously liberal TV personality.

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Not everything is a circus

Hillary Clinton? "I told her: be at my wedding and she came. You know why? She had no choice because I did [for their foundation; Note d. Red.] "And anyway, he also gave the other candidates a lot of money, including those on stage." Not me, "protested a few rivals. John Kasich and Mike Huckabee shouted at him that he could donate for them.

But not everything is a circus: the more seriously the round of ten candidates - nine of them white, ten of them male - debates, the more misplaced Trump's phrases and his refusal to answer questions in a substantive manner appear.

When things get serious, Jeb Bush's hour should strike. The former Florida governor tries to slip into the role of the relaxed adult. He presents his policy in a disciplined manner. "There should be a legal route to citizenship," he makes clear in the currently poisoned immigration debate and also defends his adherence to national educational standards. But he seems extremely anemic and defensive, more like a functionary than a presidential candidate.

Marco Rubio leaves a lasting impression

In the 120 minutes, another politician from Florida manages to combine relatively meaningful answers with a dynamic sense of mission: Senator Marco Rubio makes a surprisingly good impression. "How is Hillary supposed to teach me what it's like to live from paycheck to paycheck?" Asks the 44-year-old immigrant son, referring to Clinton's campaign focus on the middle class. "I was raised from paycheck to paycheck!"

While Chris Christie, the governor of New Jersey, and Rand Paul (senator from Kentucky) aggressively try to get themselves conscious - and back to significant polling regions - Ohio's governor John Kasich stands out from the competition with moderate tones. The Supreme Court had approved the marriage for everyone and that was to be accepted, only recently he attended the wedding of a befriended homosexual couple. He received applause for this in his home country, Ohio, the state of alternating voters.

Such moderate attitudes are seldom to be seen on this evening, however. Candidates tend to be extreme in the primary campaign, but this year shows how far the Republicans have moved to the right.